Word Sorts

Date:

Word Sort

-ly
-ily
-y



quietly
happily
rainy



dimly
noisily
sunny



slowly
angrily
snowy



roughly
easily
cloudy



daily
lazily
windy



clearly

misty



smoothly

foggy



quickly

chilly



loudly

breezy





stormy




Explanation of Sort:
What I learned this week is that a suffix is somethihng that you add to the end of a baseword to change the menaing. Also when you add y to the end of a baseword it turns the noun into an adjective. Next when you add ly or ily to a baseword it turnd an adjective into a adverb. Then a noun is a person, place, or thing. And an adjective is a word that describes a person place or thing. Finally an adverb is a word that describes a verb. That is what I learned this week.

Speed Sort


Time #1:00.30
Time #2:00:27
Time #3:00:25


Origin/Parts of Speech


Word
Origin
Part of Speech

daily
before 1000; late Middle English; Old English dæglīc. See day, -ly
adjective

misty
before 900; Middle English; Old English mistig. See mist, -y1
adjective

foggy
1520–30; fog2 + -y1 ; orig. meaning marshy, thick, murky
adjective

sunny
1250–1300 Middle English; see sun, -y1
adjective

rainy
before 1000; Middle English reyny, Old English rēnig. See rain, -y1
adjective

snowy
before 1000; Middle English snawy, Old English snāwig. See snow, -y1
adjective

cloudy
O.E. cludig "rocky, full of cliffs;" see cloud. Meaning "of thenature of clouds" is recorded from c.1300; meaning "full ofclouds" is late 14c.; that of "not clear" is from 1580s. Fig. senseof "gloomy" is late 14c.
adjective

stormy
1150–1200; Middle English; Old English stormig. See storm, -y1
adjective

windy
before 900; Middle English; Old English windig. See wind1 , -y1
adjective

chilly
1560–70; chill + -y1
adjective

breezy

adjective

happily
1300–50; Middle English; see happy, -ly
adverb

easily
1250–1300; Middle English esily. See easy, -ly
adverb

lazily

adverb

noisily
1685–95; noise + -y1
adverb

smoothly
before 1050; (adj.) Middle English smothe, late Old English smōth; compare Middle English smethe, Old English smēthe smooth;cognate with Old Saxon smōthi; (v.) late Middle English smothen, derivative of the adj.; replacing Middle English smethen, Old Englishsmēth ( i ) an
adverb

angrily
1275–1325; Middle English. See anger, -y1
adverb

clearly
1250–1300; Middle English clerli. See clear, -ly
adverb

quickly
before 1000; Middle English quikly. See quick, -ly
adverb

slowly
before 900; Middle English; Old English slāw sluggish, dull; cognatewith Dutch sleeuw; compare sloth
adverb

loudly
before 900; Middle English; Old English hlūd; cognate with OldFrisian, Old Saxon hlūd ( Dutch luid ), Old High German hlūt (German laut ); akin to Greek klytós famous
adverb

dimly
before 1000; Middle English, Old English dim ( me ), cognate withOld Frisian dim, Old Norse dimmr
adverb

roughly
late 15c., from rough (adj.). Phrase rough it (1768) is originallynautical; to rough (someone) up is from 1868. The U.S. footballpenalty roughing was originally a term from boxing (1866).
adverb

quietly
1350–1400; (adj.) Middle English (< Middle French ) < Latinquiētus, past participle of quiēscere ( see quiescent); (v.) MiddleEnglish quieten, partly derivative of the adj., partly < Late Latinquiētāre, derivative of quiētus. Compare coy
adverb

Partner Sort

Partner: Paige

-y
-ily
-ly
daily
happily
smoothly
misty
easily
angrily
foggy
lazily
clearly
sunny
noisily
quickly
rainy

slowly
snowy

loudly
cloudy

dimly
stormy

roughly
windy

quietly
chilly


breezy